©Kiki de Jonge.

Publications                              &                     Presentations

De Jonge, K. M. M., Rietzschel, E. F., & Van Yperen, N. W.

(2018). Stimulated by Novelty? The role of Psychological Needs and Perceived Creativity. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 44, 851-867.

In the current research, we aimed to address the inconsistent finding in the brainstorming literature that cognitive stimulation sometimes results from novel input, yet other times from non-novel input. We expected and found, in three experiments, that the strength and valence of this relationship are moderated by people’s psychological needs for structure and autonomy. 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2017). Media attention - expert comment:

Interview in large Dutch newspaper

Trouw: Wie thuis werkt, heeft meer profijt dan last (Blended working creates more positive opportunities than downsides).

https://www.trouw.nl/samenleving/wie-thuis-werkt-heeft-meer-profijt-dan-last~a19ecd47/

Van Yperen, N. W., Wortier, B., & De Jonge, K. M. M. (2016).

Workers’ intrinsic work motivation when job demands are high: The role of need for autonomy and perceived opportunity for blended working. Computers in Human Behavior, 60, 179-184.

Work overload or work pressure may undermine workers' intrinsic motivation. In the present research, we tested the conditions under which this may (not) occur, including the perceived opportunity to blend on-site and off-site working through the effective use of computers and modern information and communication technology. Our sample consisted of 657 workers (51% female) representing a variety of industries. As hypothesized, it is not high job demands per se, but high demands in combination with a high need for autonomy and a lack of perceived opportunities for blended working that undermines intrinsic work motivation. When workers high in need for autonomy perceived opportunities for blended working, their intrinsic work motivation was not negatively affected by increasing job demands.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M., Van Yperen, N. W., & Rietzschel, E. F. (2015). 

Age and Blended Working. In N. A. Pachana, & N. Thapa (Eds.),Encyclopedia of Geropsychology. [xxx-xxx] Springer, New York.

The workforce is aging rapidly, which means that organizations will have to learn how to manage older workers better to avoid labor shortages and a loss of organizational effectiveness. One way to do this, is to rely more on blended working practices, that is, the opportunity to blend on-site and off-site working enabled through modern information and communication technology (ICT) facilities (Van Yperen et al., 2014). This chapter summarizes and gives an overview of the opportunities and threats that blended working may have for older workers, and aims to show that blended working practices can be helpful to retain older workers and can keep them satisfied, motivated, and productive in their jobs.

 

Van Yperen, N. W., Rietzschel, E. F., & De Jonge, K. M. M. (2014).

Blended working: For whom it may (not) work. PLoS ONE, 9, e102921.

Similarly to related developments such as blended learning and blended care, blended working is a pervasive and booming trend in modern societies. Blended working combines on-site and off-site working in an optimal way to improve workers’ and organizations’ outcomes. In this paper, we examine the degree to which workers feel that the two defining features of blended working (i.e., time-independent working and location-independent working) enhance their own functioning in their jobs. Blended working, enabled through the continuing advance and improvement of high-tech ICT software, devices, and infrastructure, may be considered beneficial for workers’ perceived effectiveness because it increases their job autonomy. However, because blended working may have downsides as well, it is important to know for whom blended working may (not) work. 

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2014). Always connected at work? The role of

information novelty and individual needs. Unpublished master’s thesis, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

As a result of new ICT developments, many workers are almost constantly connected to job-relevant information and co-workers, regardless of when or where they are working. Depending on workers’ psychological needs, constantly being connected may be perceived as favorable (e.g., when it enhances task clarity or task performance) or unfavorable (e.g., when it creates ambiguity or external control). In the present research, perceiving connectedness as either favorable or unfavorable was expected be a function of (a) information novelty, (b) need for structure, and (c) need for autonomy. Indeed, in three experiments that manipulated connectedness and measured participants’ psychological needs, we found that the effects of connectedness are contingent on the fit or misfit between information novelty and individual needs. In order to reap the potential benefits from new ways of working without incurring the potential costs, these results suggest that organizations moving towards increased connectedness should take workers’ psychological needs into consideration.

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2018). Invited lecture. “Stimulating Creativity:

Matching Individual Differences and Situational Factors”

Seminar Innovation & Organization, FEB RUG.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2017). Invited lecture. Experiencing Flow at

Work: Adapting the Work Context to Your Needs”

Science Day for PhD’s and Academic Personnel at UMCG. Note: Invited but had to decline due to organizational matters.

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2017). Convenor, chair, and presentor as part

of the EAWOP Symposium: Stimulating Creativity:  Matching Individual Differences and Situational Factors. EAWOP, Dublin, Ireland. Other presenters: Matthijs Baas, Marieke Roskes, Katharina Eckartz, Michaël Van Damme, and Eric F. Rietzschel.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2017). Stimulated by Novel Ideas?

Psychological Needs and Perceived Creativity. Presentation as part of the Group Creativity Symposium, organized by Bernard Nijstad and Paul Paulus at the EASP, Granada, Spain. Other presenters: Bernard Nijstad, Jared Kenworthy & Hoon-Seok Choi.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2017). Don’t Bother me With your Weird Ideas!

Presentation at the Society of Work and Organizational Psychology Researchers (WAOP) conference, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2017). Don’t Bother me With your Boring Ideas!

Presentation at the Creativity conference, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. (Note: accepted to present, but I had to cancel due to a funeral).

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2016). Cognitive Stimulation in Brainstorming:

The (mis)fit between Psychological Needs and Diversity of Input. Presentation at the Society of Work and Organizational Psychology Researchers (WAOP) conference, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2015). Always connected at work? The role of

information novelty and individual needs. Scientific presentation at USE2015, Groningen, The Netherlands.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2015). Always connected at work? The role of

information novelty and individual needs.

Scientific presentation at EAWOP, Oslo, Norway.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2015). Age and Blended Working. Scientific

poster presentation at Heymanssymposium, Groningen, The Netherlands.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2015). Always connected at work? The role of

information novelty and individual needs. Scientific poster presentation at Heymanssymposium, Groningen, The Netherlands.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2015). Always connected at work? The role of

information novelty and individual needs. Scientific presentation as part of GAP masterthesis nomination, Groningen, The Netherlands.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2015). Blended Working: Do It Yourself.

Introduction to psychology, lecture at the RUG, Groningen, The Netherlands..

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. (2014). Always connected at work? The role of

information novelty and individual needs. Scientific presentation at WAOP, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

 

De Jonge, K. M. M. & Rietzschel, E. F. (2014). Blended working and

individual needs: the search for optimal fit. Workshop presented at the STOSO congres about our Reliance on Technology, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Blended working means being able to work anywhere you like at any time you like through the use of modern technologies. This creates exciting new opportunities for workers, but poses some tricky challenges as well. After all, not everybody has the same needs and preferences (for example, some people enjoy autonomy, while oth- ers prefer structure). Join us in this interactive workshop to investigate your own needs and their implications for your own use of blended working. 

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